Why Surfing Porn in Browser’s Incognito Mode Is Not Safe

By
June 26, 2016

Browsing for porn in your browser’s Incognito mode might not be as private as you think

Last week we had reported why logging out of Facebook while surfing porn websites is good because Facebook tracks users through the ‘Like’ and ‘Share’ buttons on such porn webpages. Carrying the research a bit further, we present you with another fact you didnt know. Surfing porn in any browser’s Incognito Mode doesnt make your porn habits private.

It is a fact that Incognito mode doesnt save history but that’s about the only protection it grants you. 99 out of 100 Google Chrome user think surfing porn in Incognito users is safe! Admit it, you use your browser’s Incognito window to surf porn yourself!!!

Why surfing in Incognito is not private?

Opening a private or incognito browser in either Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari or Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer only ensures your computer does not remember your online activity. As said above, any web browser will make sure your web searches and online history are not visible the next time you log in. And that is all that it does.

However that doesnt mean that Incognito surfing is private or anonymous. You Incognito browsing is stored by your ISP, your company and eventually the browser company. Your internet service provider – or ISP – is able to monitor every webpage and web search you made from your house.

Try opening your bank account or email webpage in Incognito mode. You will find that the data like your user name and password are filled up despite the Incognito mode not saving your data. It is fact that most browsers pull data from local memory to fill such details in both normal as well as Incognito mode.



Google has been very up-front about its privacy policy for surfing in Chrome browser Incognito mode. “Going incognito doesn’t hide your browsing from your employer, your internet service provider or the websites that you visit.” Google has warned.

Actually signing into your Gmail account in Incognito mode makes Google’s job of tracking your porn surfing habits that much more easier.

If you haven’t disabled or paused your account’s Google Web History – you are able to log-in and track your porn surfing activity there, too.

What about other browsers? Most browsers do the same thing what Google does. Like Google, Mozilla Firefox uses an almost-identical disclaimer on its private browsing mode. But again, “while this computer won’t have a record of your browsing history, your employer or internet service provider can still track the pages you visit.”

Then there is something called Super Cookies. Many porn websites use something called Super Cookies which are able to track your movements across the web even when you are browsing in private mode. Super Cookies are like the regular, a lightweight software and sit on a website and fingerprint users who visit the page. When you return to that particular page again at a later date, the website is able to track the entirety of the user’s activity between the two visits.

Considering the above facts, it is unwise to think that your Incognito mode porn surfing habits are either private or anonymous. If you really want to be anonymous, use VPN but dont be under the impression that your Incognito browsing records are private.

View Comments

  • There are a lot of false 'facts' in this article, some of them followed by 'this is fact'.

    Protip - saying 'this is fact' doesn't actually make something factual.

    "Try opening your bank account or email webpage in Incognito mode. You will find that the data like your user name and password are filled up despite the Incognito mode not saving your data."

    This is not true. Incognito mode will not fetch the autocomplete data on it's own. This will only happen if you have an auto-form-filler/autocomplete. I'd expect a writer from a site called 'techworm' to recognize the difference between a browser feature and a separate piece of software they installed themselves (autocomplete, in this case).

    "It is fact that most browsers pull data from local memory to fill such details in both normal as well as Incognito mode."

    Unfortunately, this is not fact. Your 'local memory' has nothing to do with the storage of long-term data like this. If it did, this information would disappear with every shut down of your PC. 'local memory' refers to RAM that has been designated for a single purpose or function - this has nothing to do with the long-term storage of login credentials. This data is actually stored on your hard drive, usually in a 'profiles' folder on a hard drive.

    I'm also with the others in saying that you need to provide actual information. You don't even give a baseline explanation of the points that you make in the article. For example, you mention Super Cookies.. Then you explain how -normal- cookies work, and quickly change the subject. What about super cookies? You know, the ones that actually matter in the incognito subject? Did you actually have nothing in particular to say about them, and just mentioned them to seem more thoroughly versed on the subject? Seems that way to me.

    • Uh-oh looks like Google and Firefox are getting their employees to shill out the articles people read about their mass surveillance techniques, as well as looking for alternatives. Trying to dissuade them with the, "This guy doesn't understand what he's talking about debate." Incognito Mode does save account passwords and auto-completes constantly, hell I bet Google and your ISP directly look through your Incognito habits to present the most "effective" ads for an individual.