Intel's Optane SSD: 375GB can also be used as RAM

Intel Unveils Optane SSD DC P4800X Series For Data Centres

Intel on Sunday introduced its first Optane “3D XPoint” (pronounced 3D Crosspoint) storage product, the SSD DC P4800X for the PCI Express or NVMe slots in servers. It’s basically a datacenter-focused product with high read/write loads and low latency, and can also be used as RAM. Its primary beneficiaries are data centres and companies that require high-speed storage and store huge amounts of data.

The new Intel Optane SSD DC P4800X Series will drive new solutions with applications such as artificial intelligence and machine learning, faster trading, deeper insights into medical scans, and expands the reach of cloud computing solutions.

Intel also promises higher endurance than your typical SSD. The inaugural Optane model can withstand stresses normally associated with RAM, writing about 12.3 petabytes of data in its lifespan.

“Delivering an industry-leading combination of low latency, ultra endurance, high QoS, and high throughput, the Intel Optane SSD DC P4800X Series is the most responsive data center SSD. Built with the revolutionary new 3D XPoint memory media, the SSD DC P4800X is the first product to combine the attributes of memory and storage. This innovative solution is optimized to break through storage bottlenecks by providing a new data tier. It accelerates applications for fast caching and storage, increases scale per server, and reduces transaction costs for latency sensitive workloads. In addition, data centers can now also deploy bigger and more affordable datasets to gain new insights from large memory pools,” said the company.

Intel is offering the 375GB P4800X in PCIe add-in card form factor for $1520 starting yesterday with a limited early-ship program, which will be followed by the broad availability in later 2017. During the second half of the year, a 375GB U.2 model will ship, as well as a 750GB add-in card, according to Ars Technica. The company also intends to release a 1.5TB PCIe card, and 750GB and 1.5TB U.2 stick in the second half of 2017.

Source: Ars Technica

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