Microsoft is reportedly working on ‘Project Latte’ that could allow Windows 10 users to run Android apps on Windows 10 without the need for Play Store. 

According to a report by Windows Central, Project Latte will enable developers to bring their Android apps through the Microsoft Store with little to no code adjustments by delivering them as an MSIX file, an app package format supported by the Windows 10 ecosystem. 

The project will reportedly be powered by Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) that will allow developers to convert Android apps into MSIX format and later submit them on the Microsoft Store. This will allow users to simply search for their favorite Android apps within the MS Store and install them like any other Windows app. However, the company will need to provide its own Android subsystem for Android apps to actually run.

According to Microsoft, WSL will soon receive support for Linux GUI applications, as well as GPU acceleration that should improve the performance of apps running through WSL.  

Further, most of the apps require Google Play Support services to function. Without this, apps that require API provided by Play Services will need to be updated to run on Windows 10. It would be interesting to see how Microsoft plans to address this issue or does it plan to concentrate only on apps that don’t require Play Services to function in full.

Currently, Windows 10 users can run apps on their Android smartphone through the “Your Phone” app, which is, however, limited to a handful of Samsung devices.

Project Latte is expected to launch next year as part of the Windows 10 21H2 upgrade.

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