Now protect all your gadgets with a single digital master key ‘Everykey’ from John McAfee

A new product that will protect all access-controlled devices such as laptops, smartphones, tablets or even house doors from hacking has been announced by John McAfee, a Presidential candidate and internet security expert.

Known as Everykey, it is basically an encrypted digital master key that will keep your password protected accounts safe with a simple mobile app. “Instead of carrying a bulky keychain and remembering a list of passwords, we want your access control to be something you don’t have to think about,” said McAfee in a press release .

Describing his device as a “f***ing game changer”, McAfee says that when Everykey is in range of bluetooth enabled devices and accounts, it acts as a password and login manager. “When Everykey is close to your phone, laptop, tablet, house door, car door, bike lock, or another access-controlled device, it unlocks that device and then re-locks it when you’re out of range so your device is safe and secure when it’s out of your trusted hands.”

You can also login into website accounts such as Gmail, Facebook and Twitter with this mobile security gadget. You can also remotely freeze the device from your smartphone, in the event you lose Everykey.

Pair the digital master key to your devices with the Everykey app. This little device not much bigger than a thumb drive use military grade AES 128 bit encryption, which according to McAfee is “ the same encryption that’s used by the military to protect documents with confidential and secret security levels.” Each time everykey sends a message via Bluetooth, it is different from the last to prevent a hacker from re-broadcasting the encrypted message. “Each encrypted message that’s broadcast is non-deterministic and pseudorandom,” McAfee adds.

Personal login information is not stored on the Everykey itself or associated server. Passwords are protected by an encrypted keychain on your device for added security, passwords. According to Everykey’s Indigogo campaign website, “Your Everykey broadcasts encrypted information to identify itself, which only your devices are able to decrypt.” An Everykey wristband accessory is also available.

To use Everykey with Windows 7-8.1, you will need their special Bluetooth Low Energy Dongle (BLE Dongle). However, you would not need the BLE Dongle, if your computer is running on the latest version of Windows and features Bluetooth 4.0.

As Everykey has to broadcast signals to unlock your smartphone, it encrypts these messages via Bluetooth 4.0. Every message it broadcasts is different from the last helping to prevent hacking attempts.

In the event your Everykey is lost or stolen, users have the ability to call into support by dialing 1-866-798-5577 or go online and login to your account to freeze the device to make its contents safe, which makes this one of the best password keepers.

Let’s have a look at EveryKey features and specs:

* Wi-Fi
* Bluetooth 4.0
* AES 128-bi encryption
*  Mac OS 10.9+( Mavericks, Yosemite, And Newer), Windows 7+, Ubuntu 14+ (Linux), Android 4.4+, iOS 8+ compatible
* Google Chrome v37+, Mozilla Firefox v31+, Safari 7.1+ and Microsoft Edge compatible
* 3 meter range
* Rechargeable lithium-polymer attery
* Micro USB
* 30 days battery life
* Water resistant

In September, in an op-ed published McAfee asserted, “ We’re facing a cyber war more dangerous than nuclear devastation.” McAfee is hoping to increase cyber-literacy and awareness in the U.S. by running as a part of the Cyber Party.

Shipments of the first units will begin in February 2016, as Everykey has already reached its first crowdfunding goal with at least 235 backers. Currently, for $128 USD plus shipping you can get 1 Everykey, 1 key ring accessory and 1 charging cable. You can pre-order on Indiegogo.

2 COMMENTS

  1. I take it this ‘Everykey’ would only protect your devices from unwanted physical access and remote logins?
    and not actually protect the user from compromised systems via R.A.T’s etc? As I see malware infected devices being the more common security risk for novice users…

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