The world’s largest 3D printer called Big Delta can now make entire houses out of clay

WASP unveiled the world’s largest 3D printer which could provide a solution to housing shortages by creating low cost and eco-friendly houses made of clay and mud

The 3D printing technology is getting bigger day by day. Now, the 3D printing design team at an Italian collective known as “WASP”, acronym for World’s Advanced Saving Project, have officially unveiled a 3D printer by presenting a live demonstration of the huge device at a three day rally event held in Italy which was also marked with a series of workshops and conferences.

The massive 3D printer is termed as “Big Delta” and the makers of this device claim that with 40 foot height and 20 foot in diameter, it is the world’s largest 3D printer. In addition, it is even capable of creating budget friendly clay and mud houses in just one continuous printing session.

Despite being so huge, Big Delta uses only 100 watts of power and hence it is extremely energy efficient.

It is the behemoth size of Big Delta, which enables the device to print economic houses with ease and speed.

WASP team takes its inspiration from the traditional construction methods such as those of clay and mud houses.

Big Delta is a beautiful combination of new technologies as well as ancient building techniques and it more or less emphasizes on the use of natural and eco-friendly materials for housing purposes.

According to the figures cited by the United Nations, it is estimated that by 2030 around 4 billion people who have their annual income below US $3,000 would be in need of low cost houses.
Thus WASP claims that their Big Delta 3D printer might provide the apt solution to the housing shortage for the poorer section prevailing across the World.
WASP also believes that in near future there would be a dire need of devices such as Big Delta which would surely replace the much costlier and heavily polluting building methods.

By creating Big Delta, WASP is promoting eco friendly modes of building houses because it uses materials such as mud, clay, dirt, water and natural fibers to build houses. This helps to lower the cost of the house and also since cement is not used it makes the houses more environment friendly.

The most important plus point of building a clay house is it that its maintenance cost is also low! One just needs to apply thin layers of clay externally once every five years, which is definitely cheap in comparison to the maintenance cost of a normal cement house.
For now, the WASP team anticipates using this massive Big Delta for constructing houses in the disaster areas; however they have plans to build homes even in the non disaster areas.

Big Delta works on the conventional principle of filament-based 3D printer, with the only difference being everything used here is on a much larger scale.

Though, the device is gigantic, WASP says it is quite light in weight and it is easy to collapse as well as can be easily transported in between the different construction sites.
The lightweight steel frames of the Big Delta provides support to a giant printing nozzle which extrudes and works in circular motions to create layers and layers of ceilings and walls from ground upwards, thus building an entire house.
As per the quote from Web Urbanist: “BigDelta’s structural strategies and resulting home shapes are informed by a breed of wasp that constructs mud homes as well as a long human tradition of creating earthen dwellings.”

Last year, a Chinese firm had come up with a method of assembling different parts of the houses which were printed using 3D printers and those houses would have cost around $ 5000. But, it was not like the houses built by Big Delta which are much simpler, quick to build and available at a much lower cost.

According to WASP, Big Delta will be able to help the estimated 4 billion people worldwide build their own low cost homes by 2030.

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